Circumcision and Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in a Birth Cohort

Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 152: Pages 382-387, March 2008.

NIGEL P. DICKSON, FRACP, THEA VAN ROODE, MSC, PETER HERBISON, MSC, AND CHARLOTTE PAUL, PHD

Abstract

Objective    To determine the impact of early childhood circumcision on sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition to age 32 years.

Study design    The circumcision status of a cohort of children born in 1972 and 1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand was sought at age 3 years. Information about STIs was obtained at ages 21, 26, and 32 years. The incidence rates of STI acquisition were calculated, taking into account timing of first sex, and comparisons were made between the circumcised men and uncircumcised men. Adjustments were made for potential socioeconomic and sexual behavior confounding factors where appropriate.

Results     Of the 499 men studied, 201 (40.3%) had been circumcised by age 3 years. The circumcised and uncircumcised groups differed little in socioeconomic characteristics and sexual behavior. Overall, up to age 32 years, the incidence rates for all STIs were not statistically significantly differentM-^W23.4 and 24.4 per 1000 person-years for the uncircumcised and circumcised men, respectively. This was not affected by adjusting for any of the socioeconomic or sexual behavior characteristics.

Conclusions    These findings are consistent with recent population-based cross-sectional studies in developed countries, which found that early childhood circumcision does not markedly reduce the risk of the common STIs in the general population in such countries.

(J Pediatr 2008;152:383-7)

CIRP logo Note:

CIRP Note: This paper reports actually reports a finding that the circumcised men in this study had slightly more STIs than non-circumcised men, although the finding was not "statistically significant".

From the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine (N.D., T.R., P.H., C.P.), University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Supported by the Health Research Council of New Zealand. Dr Nigel Dickson wrote the first draft of the manuscript and received no honorarium, grant, or other form of payment to produce the manuscript.

Submitted for publication May 16, 2007; last revision received Jun 20, 2007; accepted Jul 26, 2007.
Reprint requests: Dr Nigel Dickson, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago Medical School, PO Box 913, Dunedin, New Zealand. Email: nigel.dickson@otago.ac.nz. 0022-3476/$ - see front matter

Copyright M-) 2008 Mosby Inc. All rights reserved. 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.044

CIRP logo Note:

The full text portable document format file is available at http://www.doctorsopposingcircumcision.org/pdf/2008_Dickson.pdf.

Citation:

The Circumcision Information and Resource Pages are a not-for-profit educational resource and library. IntactiWiki hosts this website but is not responsible for the content of this site. CIRP makes documents available without charge, for informational purposes only. The contents of this site are not intended to replace the professional medical or legal advice of a licensed practitioner.

Top   © CIRP.org 1996-2024 | Please visit our sponsor and host:  External link IntactiWiki.